A Good Diet Boosts School Performance

Incorporate More Fruits and Veggies in Your Child's Meals




What children eat does make a difference, especially in school, reports a new study published in the Journal of School Health. To establish a link between diet and academic performance, University of Alberta researchers evaluated the lifestyle and performance of some 5,000 children. They found that students who ate more fruits and vegetables, with less calorie intake from fat, did better on their literacy tests than those eating foods high in salt and saturated fat.

These findings support the broader implementation of effective school nutrition programs that have the potential to both improve student’s academic performance and their long-term health. What constitutes a healthy diet? Ample fruits and vegetables, say the researchers, but also grains, dietary fiber, protein, calcium and a moderate intake of fat.

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