Green Wedding Traditions

How to Downsize “I Do” Footprints




An eco-friendly wedding will not only strip it of energy-sucking extras, it’s also far less expensive. Minimize the occasion’s carbon footprint by taking a cue from these standout green wedding customs and traditions from other countries.

Canada

Rather than buy wrapped gifts, guests pay for each kiss from the bride or groom, and also pay for part of the honeymoon.

China

The bride and groom travel in one car to the ceremony.

Indonesia

Family members invite weddings guests by walking to their homes to pay a visit.

Italy

Instead of gifts, a white bag called la borsa is passed around for guests to make cash donations.

Spain

A Spanish bride hand-sews an embroidered shirt for her husband to wear at the ceremony.

Sweden

The bride carries a bouquet of malodorous weeds to ward off trolls.

Marriage partners may be giving up some status symbols, but by incorporating some of these green traditions, a couple can add a matchless personal touch to their wedding that will be forever treasured.


Source: PlanetGreen.com

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