New Paradigm

Research Shows We Can Feed the World Sustainably




A benchmark study by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research says that it’s possible to sustainably feed the world’s estimated 2050 population of 9 billion, while still preserving the planet. Findings suggest that a diet equivalent to eating meat three times a week would employ green farming methods, leave forests untouched and raise animals only under free-range conditions.

“We can actually do without factory farming,” concludes Lasse Brauun, of Compassion in World Farming. “With 60 billion animals being reared for livestock production every year and the figure set to double by 2050, we really need to reconsider our approach. Animals are being reared like factory units to provide us with cheap meat. The true cost of eating too much meat is animal suffering, deforestation and obesity.”

The Indian state of Sikkim in the Himalayas is among those showing the way. The government plans to have all of its arable land of 173,000 acres certified organic by 2015.

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