Body Symmetry Correlates with Male Strength

Proportion Associated with Muscle




Research from Germany’s University of Göttingen has determined that men with greater body symmetry also have greater strength. The scientists sampled 69 heterosexual, right-handed adult men, measuring handgrip strength as a scientifically recognized means for determining power and strength, as well as fluctuating asymmetry (FA), a measure of subtle, random deviations from perfect bilateral symmetry in traits that are typically symmetrical in the general population. FA was evaluated by measuring and comparing 12 body feature traits on the right and left sides, including breadth of the hand, wrist and elbow; finger length; and facial features.

After eliminating the effects of body mass index, the researchers determined that the men with the greatest physical symmetry were stronger. Facial symmetry in males was associated with greater intelligence and better information-processing efficiency at age 83.

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