Scientists Urge Ban on Non-Stick Pan Coatings

Cookware Chemicals Extremely Dangerous to Health




A new paper published in the Environmental Health Perspectives journal warns of the continued health risks of chemicals used for non-stick pan coatings and water repellents on clothing. The chemical is being found in some municipalities’ drinking water.

More than 200 scientists signed the statement, which presents the dangers of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). These chemicals are persistently used as pan coatings, despite more than a decade of research showing associations with liver toxicity, neurological disorders, cancers of different organs and types, and heart conditions.

The paper noted that many manufacturers have discontinued long-chain PFAS production and substituted shorter-chain PFAS. The scientists caution that these shorter-chain PFAS may not effectively reduce PFAS exposure because more has to be used to achieve the same effectiveness, maintaining PFAS in the environment with exposure levels relatively unchanged. It calls for scientists, governments, chemical manufacturers and consumer product manufacturers to participate in halting all PFAS production.

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