Red/Purple Produce is Best for Our Weight and Heart

Choose This Color for Robust Benefits




New research published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition has found the color of the fruits and vegetables we eat may affect our weight and heart health differently. The study followed 1,272 people over a three-year period, beginning in 2006 and 2008. The researchers compared their respective diets over both periods with levels of cholesterol, weight and waist circumference—all measures of obesity. The research grouped fruits and vegetables into red/purple, yellow, green, orange or white.

Among women, greater consumption of red/purple fruits and vegetables was related to lower weight and abdominal fat, lower blood sugar and reduced total cholesterol. Meanwhile, greater consumption of yellow fruits and vegetables was linked to weight gain over the same period.

Among men, the researchers found those that ate more red/purple fruits and vegetables had reduced weight and waists compared to those that ate other-colored foods over the three-year period by an average of 13 and 14 percent, respectively. Greater yellow fruit consumption was linked to lower total cholesterol levels. Green and white fruits and vegetables were associated with reduced abdominal fat gain over the three-year period.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Healing Our Kids

An estimated quarter to half of American children have a diagnosed chronic condition such as autism or allergies, but an integrative approach to healing can have profound effects.

Farewell to a Beloved Pet

Innovative options now exist that honor a pet’s remains in an earth-friendly, biodegradable fashion using alkaline water, seeded pods or a manmade ocean reef.

Natural Vitamin E Lowers Heart Risks

Tocotrienols, a natural form of vitamin E found in wheat, barley, corn, rice and palm fruit, has been shown to lower high cholesterol and high blood pressure in seniors.

Music Reduces Need for Post-Surgery Opioids

After surgery, 86 percent of patients engaged in music therapy eschewed opioids and other painkillers, compared to 26 percent in a control group.

Knitting Releases the Blues

Knitting can lower depression, slow the heart rate, reduce the likelihood of dementia and distract from chronic pain, research shows.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags