No Worries: Cats Naturally Eat Less in Summer

Take Appetite Swings in Stride




A study from the University of Liverpool School of Veterinary Science has found that cats naturally eat less during the summer, indicating that owners can take such appetite swings in stride.

The researchers studied 38 cats for four years. Their collars were implanted with a microchip that recorded the amount as they ate as much as they wanted from a dispenser. The team found that cats ate an average of 15 percent less in hot weather. Their eating decreased from June through August and increased from October to February. Eating levels were intermediate in the spring and fall.

Study author Dr. Alex German observed, “Cats are more inclined to comfort eat when it’s cold outside, likely to be due to the extra energy they need to keep warm when out and about.”

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