Music Makes Exercise Easier

Provides a Workout Boost




wavebreakmedia/Shutterstock.com

Listening to music during a workout or any extended, physically demanding activity can reduce fatigue and improve performance. New research published in Psychophysiology shows that as individuals work out, their attention gradually shifts from the activity around them to internal sensations. Over an extended period, this attention shift creates a sense of exertion. Listening to music while exercising can help shift focus away from the internal fatigue and back to the external world.

Researchers from the UK’s Brunel University and University of London tested 19 healthy adults that performed two physical exertion tests while listening to either music or silence. The scientists monitored brain activity using EEG and measured task performance. While listening to music, participants showed both reduced fatigue and decreased stress-related brainwaves. They also performed their tasks more effectively than they did when music wasn’t being played.


This article appears in the November 2016 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Healing Our Kids

An estimated quarter to half of American children have a diagnosed chronic condition such as autism or allergies, but an integrative approach to healing can have profound effects.

Farewell to a Beloved Pet

Innovative options now exist that honor a pet’s remains in an earth-friendly, biodegradable fashion using alkaline water, seeded pods or a manmade ocean reef.

Natural Vitamin E Lowers Heart Risks

Tocotrienols, a natural form of vitamin E found in wheat, barley, corn, rice and palm fruit, has been shown to lower high cholesterol and high blood pressure in seniors.

Music Reduces Need for Post-Surgery Opioids

After surgery, 86 percent of patients engaged in music therapy eschewed opioids and other painkillers, compared to 26 percent in a control group.

Knitting Releases the Blues

Knitting can lower depression, slow the heart rate, reduce the likelihood of dementia and distract from chronic pain, research shows.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags