Metal and Mineral Imbalances May Produce Migraines

Trace Element Level Disturbances Could Cause Attacks




Research from Turkey’s Yüzüncü Yil University has concluded that migraines may be linked with higher levels of heavy metals in the blood and deficiencies in important minerals. The research tested 50 people, including 25 diagnosed with migraines and 25 healthy control subjects. None of those tested were taking supplements, smoked, abused alcohol or drugs or had liver or kidney disease or cardiovascular conditions.

Blood tests of both groups found that those with frequent migraines had four times the cadmium, more than twice of both the iron and the lead and nearly three times the levels of manganese in their bloodstreams compared to the healthy subjects. In addition, the migraine group had about a third of the magnesium, about 20 times less zinc and almost half the copper levels compared to the healthy group. “In light of our results, it can be said that trace element level disturbances might predispose people to migraine attacks,” the researchers stated.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Healing Our Kids

An estimated quarter to half of American children have a diagnosed chronic condition such as autism or allergies, but an integrative approach to healing can have profound effects.

Farewell to a Beloved Pet

Innovative options now exist that honor a pet’s remains in an earth-friendly, biodegradable fashion using alkaline water, seeded pods or a manmade ocean reef.

Natural Vitamin E Lowers Heart Risks

Tocotrienols, a natural form of vitamin E found in wheat, barley, corn, rice and palm fruit, has been shown to lower high cholesterol and high blood pressure in seniors.

Music Reduces Need for Post-Surgery Opioids

After surgery, 86 percent of patients engaged in music therapy eschewed opioids and other painkillers, compared to 26 percent in a control group.

Knitting Releases the Blues

Knitting can lower depression, slow the heart rate, reduce the likelihood of dementia and distract from chronic pain, research shows.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags