Ingrown Nails Linked to Over-Trimming

Take Caution When Cutting




A study from the UK’s University of Nottingham published in the journal Physical Biology has found that over-trimming nails can lead to structural changes to the shape of the nail that increase the risk of ingrown nails and other nail conditions. The risk was more prevalent in larger nails, such as large toenails and thumbnails.

The researchers furthered a hypothesis called the theory of nail plate adhesion that links the nail’s healthy growth to the side-to-side curvatures of the nail plate. The researchers identified that when this nail plate adhesion becomes weakened through trimming, it can result in one of three potential nail conditions: spoon-shaped or pincer-shaped nails, or ingrown nails.

The paper noted deficiencies among many nail salons regarding these potential conditions. While they may be reversed over time with careful maintenance, prevention is the best medicine, according to the researchers.

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