Exercise in Midlife Helps Preserve Mental Sharpness

Keeps Cognitive Impairment at Bay




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A study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease in July confirms that physical activity in midlife can help reduce the chances of developing cognitive impairment in old age. Scientists studied data on the physical activity levels from 3,050 twins in Finland given questionnaires in 1975 and 1981.

A phone interview more than 25 years later served as a follow-up cognitive evaluation, and the subjects were divided into three categories: cognitively impaired, suffering mild cognitive impairment or cognitively healthy. Individuals that participated in vigorous physical activity when they were middle-aged displayed lower levels of cognitive impairment compared to those that did less vigorous exercise.


This article appears in the January 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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