Colon Cancer Linked to Gut Bacteria

Study Finds Connection




A study from the University of Minnesota has found that two strains of virulent bacteria in the gut significantly increase the incidence of colon cancer, and a change in microbiology of the gut often coincides with colon cancer. The study tested 88 people, of which half had colon tumors.

The scientists sampled and analyzed gut bacteria within the subjects to assess their microbiomes. They found that colon cancers were linked to those with microbiomes that had increased levels of Fusobacteria and Providencia species of bacteria. The latter is considered more virulent and responsible for the production of certain enzymes that have been previously linked with colon cancer.

These two species of bacteria have also been linked with higher rates of inflammation and infection in other research. Fusobacteria has been found prevalent among people with ulcerative colitis. Providencia species include E. coli and Klebsiella, both found among urinary tract infections, throat infections and others.

Microbiological science over the past half a century has found that better food choices can bring about significant healthful changes in the body’s microbiome. These include incorporating prebiotic and fermented foods into one’s diet.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Healing Our Kids

An estimated quarter to half of American children have a diagnosed chronic condition such as autism or allergies, but an integrative approach to healing can have profound effects.

Farewell to a Beloved Pet

Innovative options now exist that honor a pet’s remains in an earth-friendly, biodegradable fashion using alkaline water, seeded pods or a manmade ocean reef.

Natural Vitamin E Lowers Heart Risks

Tocotrienols, a natural form of vitamin E found in wheat, barley, corn, rice and palm fruit, has been shown to lower high cholesterol and high blood pressure in seniors.

Music Reduces Need for Post-Surgery Opioids

After surgery, 86 percent of patients engaged in music therapy eschewed opioids and other painkillers, compared to 26 percent in a control group.

Knitting Releases the Blues

Knitting can lower depression, slow the heart rate, reduce the likelihood of dementia and distract from chronic pain, research shows.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags