Acupuncture Eases Hot Flashes

Treatment for Menopause Symptoms




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Researchers from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center tested 209 women between 45 and 60 years old with a history of hot flashes and/or night sweats. After up to 20 treatments over six months, the women receiving acupuncture reported a 37 percent reduction in hot flashes, while the control group saw a 6 percent increase. The symptom relief among the women treated with acupuncture persisted for a year.

The researchers also found that the acupuncture group experienced an improvement in several menopausal quality of life measurements. Nancy Avis, Ph.D., a professor of public health sciences at Wake Forest University and lead author of the study, says, “There are a number of nonhormonal options for treating hot flashes and night sweats that are available to women. None seem to work for everyone, but our study showed that acupuncture from a licensed acupuncturist can help some women without any side effects. It also showed that the maximum benefit occurred after about eight treatments.”


This article appears in the October 2016 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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