Acupuncture Eases Hot Flashes

Treatment for Menopause Symptoms




Tyler Olson/Shutterstock.com

Researchers from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center tested 209 women between 45 and 60 years old with a history of hot flashes and/or night sweats. After up to 20 treatments over six months, the women receiving acupuncture reported a 37 percent reduction in hot flashes, while the control group saw a 6 percent increase. The symptom relief among the women treated with acupuncture persisted for a year.

The researchers also found that the acupuncture group experienced an improvement in several menopausal quality of life measurements. Nancy Avis, Ph.D., a professor of public health sciences at Wake Forest University and lead author of the study, says, “There are a number of nonhormonal options for treating hot flashes and night sweats that are available to women. None seem to work for everyone, but our study showed that acupuncture from a licensed acupuncturist can help some women without any side effects. It also showed that the maximum benefit occurred after about eight treatments.”


This article appears in the October 2016 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Green Surfing

Ecosia, a German Internet search engine, has planted more than 52 million trees in the last 10 years by diverting its advertising revenue to funding new trees worldwide.

Aqua Breakthrough

Chinese scientists have used ultraviolet light and graphitic carbon nitride to purify two and a half gallons of water in one hour.

Far Out

The outermost region of the Earth’s atmosphere has been newly determined to reach out much farther than the moon.

Baby Balking

The U.S. birthrate has been falling steadily, partly because prospective parents are worried about the increased frequency and intensity of storm, drought and wildfires, as well as about growing geopolitical unrest and resource scarcity.

Revamping Recycling

China, a major importer of recycled waste, is rejecting shipments contaminated by greasy pizza boxes, polyethylene-lined disposable coffee cups, and plastics like yogurt cups and butter tubs.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags