Well Well

New Healthy Building Standard




The WELL Building Standard, administered by the International WELL Building Institute, is the world’s first development criterion to focus exclusively on human health and wellness. It marries best practices in design and construction with evidence-based medical and scientific research, harnessing the built environment as a vehicle to support human health and well-being.

Pioneered by the Delos company and the culmination of seven years of research in partnership with leading scientists, doctors, architects and wellness thought leaders, WELL is grounded in a body of medical research that explores the connection between the buildings where people spend more than 90 percent of their time and the health and wellness impacts on occupants. It sets performance requirements in seven categories: air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and state of mind.

WELL-certified spaces can help foster improvements in the nutrition, fitness, moods, sleep patterns and performance of occupants. WELL is independently certified by Green Business Certification Inc., which administers the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program and associated professional credentialing program.


Source: Delos.com

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