Supreme Hope

Online Summer of Peace Program Continues




Designed by The Shift Network as “the largest virtual peace event on the planet,” a free, online three-month global movement program, The Summer of Peace, continues through September 21. It promises to inspire participants by teaching ways to heal conflicts within oneself, in relationships and in the world using peace, instead of conflict, as the new baseline.

Featured thought leaders include Deepak Chopra, Ervin Laszlo, Grandmother Agnes Pilgrim, Karen Armstrong, Lisa Garr and Congressman Tim Ryan, plus messages from the Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Jane Goodall. Programs include The Subtle Activism Summit: Inner Dimensions of Peace Building from September 8 to 10, and 11 Ways to Transform Your World from September 11 to 21, concluding on the United Nations International Day of Peace.

“You’ll discover more personal ease, joy and well-being with techniques to connect more profoundly to the deep peace within yourself and the latest in the science of compassion,” says Garr, host of The Aware Show and Being Aware and bestselling author of Becoming Aware. She also attests that participants will find the best practices for citizen engagement and conscious activism to help accelerate the shift to a world of peace.


For more information or to register, visit SummerOfPeace.net.

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