Monsanto Pushback

More Countries Ban Toxic Roundup




Countries are gradually banning the use of Monsanto Roundup herbicide around the world as a danger to the environment and human health, and Bermuda is one of the latest to join the ranks. These moves come soon after a recently published metastudy conducted by the World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer published in The Lancet Oncology determined that glyphosate, the main ingredient in Roundup, is probably carcinogenic to humans.

Colombia stopped using Roundup to kill illegal coca plants. France banned the sale to homeowners, and Germany is poised to do the same. A group of 30,000 Argentine physicians are calling for a ban there, where it’s blamed for boosting birth defects and cancer. Others, including the Brazilian federal prosecutor, are demanding that Roundup’s active ingredient, glyphosate, be pulled off the shelves.

In the U.S., the Institute for Responsible Technology (IRT) is assisting efforts in cities, counties and school systems to enact immediate bans of glyphosate-based sprays. IRT is also calling for schools to measure the amount of glyphosate residues in school meals and to take steps to eliminate them if found.


Source: EcoWatch

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