Bright Idea

Incandescent Lights Reinvented as Eco-Friendly




Sergey Nivens/Shutterstock.com

Older incandescent light bulbs have been phased out in many countries because they waste huge amounts of energy as heat, but scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have reported in Nature Nanotechnology that they are finding a way to recycle the waste energy and focus it back onto the filament, where it’s re-emitted as visible light. Their innovative structure is made from thin, stacked layers of a type of light-controlling crystal that allows visible wavelengths to pass through while reflecting infrared back to the filament as if striking a mirror.

Traditional bulbs are banned in the European Union and Canada, and their manufacture and importation are being phased out in the U.S. They’ve been replaced by more expensive compact fluorescent (CFL) and light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs, which are significantly more efficient. In theory, the crystal structures could boost the efficiency of incandescent bulbs to 40 percent, making them three times more efficient than the best available LED and CFL bulbs.


Source: BBC


This article appears in the October 2016 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Healing Our Kids

An estimated quarter to half of American children have a diagnosed chronic condition such as autism or allergies, but an integrative approach to healing can have profound effects.

Farewell to a Beloved Pet

Innovative options now exist that honor a pet’s remains in an earth-friendly, biodegradable fashion using alkaline water, seeded pods or a manmade ocean reef.

Natural Vitamin E Lowers Heart Risks

Tocotrienols, a natural form of vitamin E found in wheat, barley, corn, rice and palm fruit, has been shown to lower high cholesterol and high blood pressure in seniors.

Music Reduces Need for Post-Surgery Opioids

After surgery, 86 percent of patients engaged in music therapy eschewed opioids and other painkillers, compared to 26 percent in a control group.

Knitting Releases the Blues

Knitting can lower depression, slow the heart rate, reduce the likelihood of dementia and distract from chronic pain, research shows.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags