Freebie Fruit

Online Mapping Points the Way

Falling Fruit (, created by Caleb Philips, co-founder of Boulder Food Rescue, and Ethan Welty, a photographer and geographer based in Boulder, Colorado, uses a map to cite locations of fruits and vegetables that are free to forage around the world. It looks like a Google map, with reported locations marked with dots.

Zoom in and click on one to find a description of what tree or bush is there. The description often includes information about the best season to pluck plant fruits, the quality and yield, a link to the species’ profile on the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s website and additional advice on accessing the spot.

Welty compiled most of the half-million or so locations from various municipal databases, local foraging organizations and urban gardening groups. Additionally, the map is open for Wikipedia-style public editing. He says, “Falling Fruit pinpoints all sorts of tasty trees in public parks, lining city streets and even hanging over fences from the UK to New Zealand.” It also lists beehives, public water wells and even dumpsters with excess food waste.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Dangers in the Cosmetic Bag

Made-in-USA cosmetics commonly include toxic ingredients banned in the European Union; a nifty phone app can help us know when to take a pass.

Sharing Our Bounty

Healthy eating matters to everyone, so it’s most helpful to donate high-protein, low-sodium, low-sugar nonperishables.

What’s Your Child’s EQ?

By listening closely to our children and validating their emotions, we can empower them to better handle tough situations, sometimes all on their own.

True Wealth

Trading in time and health for more money to buy more stuff turns out to be a poor equation for happiness.

Having Gratitude Yields More Happiness than Having Things

In two studies, students with high amounts of gratitude were happier and had more self-esteem than students focused on material goals.
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags