No GMOs

Stop Monsanto’s Attacks on Safe Food Laws




Beyond continuing its well-documented opposition to genetically modified (GMO) labeling laws in order to protect its corporate interests, Monsanto has recently launched aggressive backdoor attacks on organic and non-GMO farmers and consumers. The corporation’s rider attached to the U.S. House of Representatives’ 2013 Agriculture Appropriations Bill would allow planting of new genetically engineered (GE) crops—even when courts rule that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has approved them illegally.

Now, Monsanto has slipped an even more dangerous provision, HR 872, into the house version of the Farm Bill. This so-called Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act would stop the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from reviewing new and expanded uses of pesticides (often caused by the introduction of herbicideresistant GMO crops) and require the USDA to approve GE crops easier and faster.

Most GMO crops have been genetically engineered to withstand spraying with herbicides whose toxic ingredients remain in the plants and then enter the environment and food chain. The American Academy of Environmental Medicine links GMO foods with adverse health effects, and the President’s Cancer Panel Report advises against choosing foods grown with pesticides, herbicides and chemical fertilizers.

Join with millions of other concerned consumers and national organizations, such as the Organic Consumers Association, Center for Food Safety, United Farm Workers, American Public Health Association, Sierra Club, Rainforest Action Network and Institute for Responsible Technology, to safeguard our food supply and environment. Tell Congress to remove Monsanto’s toxic provisions.


Take action to protect citizens’ food at Tinyurl.com/StopMonsantoNow.

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