Benefit-Boosting Broccoli Sprouts

Packed with Cancer-Fighting Enzymes




Broccoli has become a gold medal contender among vegetables, so how often should we eat it to reap all of its health benefits? Elizabeth Jeffery, a University of Illinois professor of nutritional sciences, explains: “Broccoli, prepared correctly, is an extremely potent cancer-fighting agent—three to five servings a week are enough to have an effect. To get broccoli’s benefits, though, the enzyme myrosinase has to be present; if not, sulforaphane, broccoli’s cancer-preventive and anti-inflammatory component, doesn’t form.”

According to Jeffery, myrosinase is often destroyed by overcooking. Health-conscious consumers that use broccoli powder supplements in recipes to boost their nutrition also are missing out, she says, because the supplements often do not contain the needed enzyme.

A solution: Jeffery suggests incorporating fresh broccoli sprouts into our diet. Available at most grocery and health food stores, the sprouts contain abundant myrosinase.


Source: University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Milk Chocolate Also Benefits Heart Health

Harvard researchers found that people eating one to 12 ounces a month of milk chocolate – but less than 30 ounces – had a lower risk of irregular heartbeat.

Cranberry Prebiotic Promotes Gut Health

The cell walls of cranberries contain a compound that acts as a prebiotic by feeding more nutrients to the “good bacteria” in our gut.

Maple Syrup Gives Good Gut

The inulin in pure maple sugar encourages the growth of desirable bacteria in the gut, say researchers from the University of Rhode Island.

Drinking More Water Improves Food Intake

People that drink more water in the course of a day tend to eat less, especially fat, sugar, and sodium, a University of Illinois study found.

Veggie, Fish and Nut Fats Preserve Heart Health

In a Harvard study, people that replaced a portion of their normal dairy foods with vegetables, nuts and fish reduced their heart-disease risk by a quarter, while people that replaced the dairy with animal fats increased their risk by six percent.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags