Water Fluoridation Gets Another Thumbs-Down

Dangerous Risks Associated with Fluoride




An extensive review of research from the UK’s University of Kent has concluded that fluoridation of municipal water supplies may be more harmful than helpful, because the reduction in dental cavities from fluoride is due primarily from its topical application instead of ingestion. Published in the Scientific World Journal earlier this year, the review, which covered 92 studies and scientific papers, concludes that early research showing a reduction of children’s tooth decay from municipal water fluoridation may have been flawed and hadn’t adequately measured the potential harm from higher fluoride consumption.

The researchers note that total fluoride intake from most municipalities can significantly exceed the daily recommended intake of four milligrams per day, and that overconsumption is associated with cognitive impairment, thyroid issues, higher fracture risk, dental fluorosis (mottling of enamel) and enzyme disruption. The researchers also found clear evidence for increased risk of uterine and bladder cancers in areas where municipal water was fluoridated.

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