Eco-Power Tower

Meet the World’s Greenest Office Building




photo by Nic Lehoux

Even on cloudy days, the photovoltaic-paneled roof of the Bullitt Center, in Seattle, Washington, generates all the electricity the six-story structure requires. Inside, commercial office space is equipped with composting toilets, rainwater showers and a glass-enclosed stairway to encourage climbing exercise over riding the elevator.

The Bullitt Foundation, founded in 1952, has focused since the 1990s on helping cities function more like ecosystems. Seattle’s new building not only provides space for eco-conscious tenants, but also functions as a learning center, demonstrating how people and businesses can coexist more in harmony with nature.

The Bullitt Center was constructed according to a demanding green building certification program called the Living Building Challenge, which lists zero net use of energy and water among its many requirements. The standards far surpass those of the better-known Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program.

Founder Jason McLennan says the challenge is to encourage others to build more enjoyable, sustainable and affordable structures around the world.


Source: Yes! magazine

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