PFCs Linked to Early Menopause

The Effects on Women's Hormones




In the largest study ever done on the effects of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) on women’s hormone systems, West Virginia University researchers found in blood tests that higher levels of these manmade chemicals are associated with early menopausal symptoms in females aged 42 to 64. Premature menopause has been linked to a variety of health problems, including cardiovascular disease.

Researchers collected data from 25,957 women, measuring serum concentration levels of PFCs and the female hormone estradiol, and reported a definite association between PFC exposure, decreased estradiol and early menopause. Women with high blood levels of PFCs also had significantly lower concentrations of estrogen, compared with peers showing low levels of the chemicals.

PFCs are found in many common household products, including food containers, clothing, furniture, carpets and paints. Their broad use has resulted in widespread dissemination in water, air, soil, plant life, animals and humans, even in remote parts of the world. A probability sample of U.S. adults conducted by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found measurable concentrations of PFCs in 98 percent of the participants tested.


Source: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism

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