Water Bubble

Two Reports Project Fresh Water Scarcity by 2030




A recent report by the World Economic Forum warns that half the world’s population will be affected by water shortages within 20 years. Unsustainable conditions are headed toward what the researchers term, “water bankruptcy,” that could incite a crisis greater than the current global financial downturn. Crops and people are in danger, as geopolitical conflicts are expected to rise due to dwindling water resources.

During the 20th century, world population increased fourfold, but the amount of fresh water that it used increased nine times over. Already, 2.8 billion people live in areas of high water stress, according to the analysis. A concurring UN World Water Development Report adds that shortages are already beginning to constrain economic growth in areas as diverse as California, China, Australia, India and Indonesia. The Associated Press reports that the pivotal Ogallala Aquifer, in America’s Great Plains breadbasket, stretching from South Dakota to North Texas, continues to be drained at alarming rates, while the natural recharge rate is considered negligible.

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Join in a Climate Strike Event

People have been conducting strikes as a method of demanding change for many years.

Sustainable Scrubbing

Cleaning the house shouldn’t be a health hazard, yet studies have linked many popular cleaning products to asthma and other respiratory ills, developmental problems in young children and breast cancer.

Cetacean Liberation

Canada’s Parliament recently passed legislation banning the practice of breeding and keeping whales, dolphins and porpoises in captivity.

Growing Pains

Cultivation throughout the U.S. is becoming more difficult because of unpredictable weather patterns, leading to higher prices and lowered productivity.

Cola Quandary

Vietnam is among the biggest contributors to plastic waste in the ocean, and Suntory Holdings, a giant Japanese beverage company, has joined its rivals Coca-Cola and Nestlé to encourage new recycling strategies to fend off such actions as the European Union’s move toward outlawing single-use plastic items.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags