A Good Diet Boosts School Performance

Incorporate More Fruits and Veggies in Your Child's Meals




What children eat does make a difference, especially in school, reports a new study published in the Journal of School Health. To establish a link between diet and academic performance, University of Alberta researchers evaluated the lifestyle and performance of some 5,000 children. They found that students who ate more fruits and vegetables, with less calorie intake from fat, did better on their literacy tests than those eating foods high in salt and saturated fat.

These findings support the broader implementation of effective school nutrition programs that have the potential to both improve student’s academic performance and their long-term health. What constitutes a healthy diet? Ample fruits and vegetables, say the researchers, but also grains, dietary fiber, protein, calcium and a moderate intake of fat.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Gardening Asanas

Overdoing garden work can produce aches and pains, but by integrating yoga positions while planting and weeding, we can emerge pain-free after hours of being on our knees and bending.

Indigenous Wisdom

Indigenous elders from around the world meet together to pass down four sacred gifts of wisdom we would do well to heed.

Nature’s Remedies

Creatures in the wild ranging from microbes to elephants cope with parasites, pests and pain using natural substances; it all suggests why our preserving the natural world is good for us, too.

Healthy Climate, Healthy People

As the Earth slowly heats up, we’re being affected by rising allergens, disaster-related trauma and the increase in insects carrying dangerous diseases.

Whole Grains Help Us Eat Less

When overweight Danes exchanged refined grain products such as white bread and pasta for whole-grain equivalents, they tended to feel full sooner, eat less, lose weight and have less inflammation.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags