The Other Problem with Trans Fats

More Motive to Avoid Them




To keep the holidays merry, rather than moody, check labels when stocking the pantry and avoid products containing trans fatty acids, which not only contribute to insulin resistance, inflammation and heart disease, but also exacerbate mood swings. After studying nearly 1,000 men and women of all ages and ethnic backgrounds, researchers at the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine found that consumption of dietary trans fatty acids (dTFA) was significantly associated with greater aggression and irritability.

The study, led by Associate Professor Dr. Beatrice Golomb, provides the first evidence linking dTFA with adverse behaviors, ranging from impatience to overt aggression. Analysis of participants’ baseline dietary information and behavioral assessments were adjusted for sex, age, education and use of alcohol or tobacco products.

The new finding strengthens health experts’ recommendations to avoid eating products like margarines, shortenings and prepared foods that contain trans fats and to steer clear of serving them in schools and other institutions.


Source: PLoS One

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