Fact Quest

Students Thirst for Eco-Knowledge




As part of its 25th Envirothon, a competition for students across the United States to test their knowledge on environmental issues, a survey commissioned by Canon U.S.A. and conducted online by Harris Interactive found that a majority of 14-to-18-year-olds looking for information about the environment seek it outside of the classroom. Data also indicate that teens believe environmental issues will have an impact on their lives in the future and want to know more about them.

With three-quarters feeling that school curricula are inadequate, two-thirds of the students use TV as their primary information source. A majority of surveyed teens ages 16 to 18 favor the Internet, print newspapers and other periodocals.

Seventy-five percent of all of the teens surveyed believe that humans have a major impact on climate change. The top three environmental changes that they fear will impact their quality of life are poor air quality (66 percent), global warming (61 percent) and poor solid waste management (59 percent). Other major areas of concern are deforestation, water shortages and energy availability.

Students are also looking for ways they can help, such as recycling, conserving electricity and water, cleaning up public spaces, carpooling, bicycling and using public transportation.


Get involved at EnviroThon.org.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Solar Powered

Newly invented pipes can be laid under asphalt roads to trap heat, transforming blacktopped streets into giant solar collectors.

Eco-Gyms

A new breed of “green” gyms and fitness centers is adding electricity-generating workout equipment and other strategies to help the planet.

Sea Power

Harnessing tidal currents on the seafloor may be the wave of the future for electrical power.

Water Bubble

A recent report by the World Economic Forum warns that half the world’s population will be affected by water shortages within 20 years.

Population Control

Statisticians have anazlyed the greenhouse effect carbon legacy of choosing not to have a child.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags