EPA Blooper

Bee-Toxic Pesticide Approved




The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved cyantraniliprole, a new systemic pesticide that is toxic to bees, for agricultural use and has set allowable residue limits on almonds, berries, leafy vegetables and milk. The EPA also approved it as a seed treatment, so it may show up in GMO (genetically modified) seeds in the future.

Cyantraniliprole has been proven to cause liver toxicity, and the EPA notes that it also alters the stability of the thyroid as tested on laboratory rats. Although the agency maintains that the pesticide is not a direct thyroid toxicant, any indirect effects on this glandular function are likely to disrupt the endocrine system. As its current endocrine disruptor screening program is still in the process of validating tests, EPA registration of the new active ingredient is questionable.


Source: EcoWatch.com

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