Sour News About Sweet Drinks

More Risks Associated Consuming Soda




Drinking sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages may increase a woman’s risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2011. Middle-aged and older women that drank two or more such drinks per day were nearly four times as likely to develop high triglycerides and significantly more likely to develop impaired fasting glucose levels, plus increase their waist size. The study also noted that risk factors for heart disease and stroke developed even when the women didn’t gain weight.

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More from Natural Awakenings

Teetotalers Enjoy Less Heart Disease

A Canadian meta-analysis of 45 studies found that former and occasional drinkers have a 45 percent greater risk of heart disease than non-drinkers.

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Heart attack hospital admissions declined in New York counties that banned trans fat food in restaurants.

The Five-Second Rule Debunked

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Energy Drinks Harm the Heart

Two cans of an energy drink per day produced abnormal heart rhythms and higher blood pressure in healthy adults.

High-Fructose Sweetener Aggravates Asthma and Bronchitis

People with a history of chronic bronchitis that routinely drank five or more high-fructose corn syrup sodas a week showed an 80 percent increase in bronchitis incidents.
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