Frugal Fun

Enjoy the Great Outdoors at Florida State Parks




Created in 1935 by the Florida Legislature, the Florida State Parks system has grown from eight to 160 parks that include 100 miles of beaches, eight National Historical Landmarks and 39 sites on the National Register of Historic Places, as well as lakes, rivers and springs. Today, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Florida Park Service manages more than 700,000 acres of Florida’s natural environment. It stands as the National Recreation and Park Association’s first and only two-time Gold Medal winner for the nation’s best park service.

 “The 75th anniversary of the Florida State Parks system represents an important milestone in the state’s history, showing the foresight of Florida’s early leaders to preserve valuable pieces of the state’s landscape,” says Florida Park Service Director Mike Bullock. He speaks on behalf of the organization’s 1,000 staff, aided by 6,000 volunteers who last year contributed 1.2 million hours of service. They help maintain the system’s 3,400 campsites, 260 cabins and 14,000 park programs in the public lands enjoyed by 21.4 million park visitors last year. The annual economic impact is nearly $1 billion.

Affordable, family-friendly activities encompass swimming, hiking, bicycling, paddling, diving, fishing, camping, birding, ranger-led tours and events. Everyone is invited to enjoy the 25 signature anniversary events scheduled throughout 2010.

 

Find special events, contests and discounts at http://FloridaStateParks.org and http://Twitter.com/FLstateparks.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Hopeful Sign

The Humane Society and other groups succeeded in lobbying Congress’s 2018 budgetary process to preserve protection for wild horses and burros, wolves and puppies in mills.

Pipeline Slowdown

The controversial Atlantic Coast Pipeline has been delayed after the builder missed a tree-cutting deadline required for bird and bat protection.

Climate Consensus

Scientists are warning that if humans don’t reduce greenhouse gas emissions drastically and maintain natural carbon sinks like forests within 10 years, the impact on Earth’s climate will be catastrophic.

Big Melt

A thaw over the tip of the planet this year warmed the surface of the North Pole as high as 35 degrees—a once-rare event that has occurred during four of the last five winters.

Sinking City

By factoring in the settling of artificial landfill as water aquifers empty, scientists now estimate that 166 square miles of land around the bay is in jeopardy of being underwater by 2100.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags