Dolphin Friends

Call for More Humane Treatment




New research reveals that many modern dolphin brains are significantly larger than our own and second in mass to the human brain when corrected for body size. “Dolphins are sophisticated, self-aware, highly intelligent beings with individual personalities, autonomy and an inner life,” said Lori Marino, an Emory University neuroscientist at a recent American Association for the Advancement of Science conference.

Marino and other experts are concerned by, among other things, the growing industry of capturing and confining dolphins, and then having them perform in marine parks or to swim with tourists at resorts. The approach is misinformed and needs to be reconsidered, she says, as “Dolphins are vulnerable to tremendous suffering and psychological trauma.” An earlier study indicated that dolphins’ self-awareness is similar to that in higher primates and elephants.

The recent Oscar-winning documentary, The Cove, addresses the extremes human disregard for dolphin populations can reach if left unchecked. Take Action by petitioning leaders in the U.S. and Japan to protect the world’s dolphins at www.TheCoveMovie.com.

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