World Ocean Day

One Climate, One Ocean, One Future




Thousands of concerned citizens will gather on World Ocean Day, June 8, to deepen awareness of the universal benefits and alarming plight of Earth’s oceans, and the need to stop human activities from harming them. Inspiring community events, activities and celebrations will roll out at aquariums, zoos, museums and other educational institutions in all 50 states and 70 countries, based on the 2009 theme, “One climate, one ocean, one future.”

According the World Ocean Network, the oceans have, “never deteriorated so much in five years.” Fish populations are falling sharply; invasive species and diseases are spreading; coral reefs are dying; and pollution continues to threaten marine life, including plankton and shellfish that form the base of the food chain. Escalating carbon dioxide saturation is acidifying and altering ecologies in the warming waters of our oceans, which play a crucial role in maintaining Earth’s climate.

Find ideas for individuals, families, communities, artists, educators and conservationists who want to join in at www.TheOceanProject.org/wod/wod_ideas.php.

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