Feeding the World

UN Lauds Small-Scale, Sustainable Agriculture

A recent publication from the United Nations Commission on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), Trade and Environment Review 2013: Wake Up Before it is Too Late, includes contributions from more than 60 experts around the world. They are calling for transformative changes in food, agriculture and trade systems to increase diversity on farms, reduce use of fertilizer and other inputs, support small-scale farmers and create strong local food systems.

The report includes in-depth sections on the shift toward more sustainable, resilient agriculture; livestock production and climate change; the importance of research and extension; plus the roles of both land use and reform of global trade rules.

The report’s findings contrast starkly to the accelerated push for new free trade agreements, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the U.S./EU Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), which will strengthen the hold of multinational corporate and financial firms on the global economy. Neither global climate talks nor other global food security forums reflect the urgency expressed in the UNCTAD report to transform agriculture.

Source: Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (iatp.org)

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Wind Harvest

The first floating wind farm in the UK, Hywind in Scotland, will have a 30-megawatt capacity to provide clean energy to 20,000 homes.

Fossilized Financing

The world’s biggest economies provide four times more public financing for fossil fuels than for renewable energies.

Renewable Payoff

For a few hours last May, Germany’s renewable mix of energy generated so much power that customers were actually paid for using electricity.

Sealife Sanctuary

Greenpeace is working with the European Union and Germany to set aside an Antarctic sanctuary of almost three-quarters of a million square miles to protect whales, penguins and other wildlife.

Bureaucratic Bungle

The agriculture giant’s newest weed-killer, dicamba, is facing opposition from farmers that report crop damage and human health issues.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags