Legumes Improve Blood Sugar, Blood Pressure

The Power of Beans




A cup of beans a day may keep the doctor away. In a randomized trial published in the Archives of Internal Medicine of 121 participants diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, daily consumption of approximately one cup of legumes (peas and beans) was found to improve glycemic control and reduce systolic blood pressure and heart rate, thereby reducing participants’ calculated risk score for coronary heart disease (CHD).

Body weight, waist circumference and fasting blood glucose and triglyceride levels also decreased on the legume diet. Legumes appear to make dietary carbohydrates digest more slowly and with a lower glycemic index, which has been associated with reduced hypertension and fewer CHD events in pre-diabetic individuals.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Fiber Lowers Blood Sugar

A diet high in diverse fibers lowered blood sugar levels to normal for 89 percent of diabetes patients in a Rutgers University study.

Eating Apples and Tomatoes Repairs Lungs

Fresh tomatoes and fruit, especially apples, help heal damaged lungs of ex-smokers and can slow the natural decline of lung function that typically occurs after age 30.

Gooseberries are Good for the Gut

Malaysian subjects with gastrointestinal problems had less pain, vomiting and sleep loss when receiving an ayurvedic remedy known as Indian gooseberry.

Chocolate and Olive Oil Help Heart Health

Italians eating dark chocolate combined with olive oil had lower cholesterol and blood pressure in just 28 days.

Lutein in Greens and Eggs Slows Cognitive Aging

In a University of Illinois study, adults that ate large amounts of leafy greens, avocados and eggs had levels of lutein, a brain and eye nutrient, on par with younger people.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags