Coyote Ugly

Critters Becoming New Urban Pioneers




Stray dogs and feral cats in our cities may be supplanted by raccoons, foxes and coyotes if current trends continue. Even mountain lions and bears are unexpectedly showing up in urban landscapes. Evidence suggests that clashes between humans and other predators will increase and potentially intensify.

Ohio State University Biologist Stan Gehrt stated, “The coyote is the test case for other animals,” at an EcoSummit 2012 conference in Columbus, Ohio. “We’re finding that these animals are much more flexible than we gave them credit for, and they’re adjusting to our cities.” Coyotes, commonplace around many metropolitan areas, don’t seem to mind the density, with some packs each confining themselves to a one-third-square-mile territory.

Eradication efforts have sometimes faltered, partially because of public backlashes sympathetic to wild animals, plus a pattern in which new coyotes tend to quickly move into areas where other animals have been evicted. Gehrt poses the question, “Are we going to be able to adjust to them living with us or are we not going to be able to coexist?”


Source: The Christian Science Monitor

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

In Vitro Corals

Frustrated by vanishing reefs, scientists are fertilizing coral sperm and eggs in labs and returning them to the wild.

Algae Alchemy

Two Dutch designers are processing live algae into material that can be used for 3-D printing of such items as shampoo bottles and trash bins.

Lower Overhead

Cincinnati has purchased 100 percent renewable energy to operate most of its municipal buildings through at least 2021, cutting its utility rates by more than $100,000 annually.

Independent Action

More than 50 mayors from around the globe have signed the Chicago Climate Charter, intended to guide cities toward reaching greenhouse gas emissions reductions similar to those targeted in the Paris climate accord.

Deadly Cargo

The Iranian tanker Sanchi oil spill in the East China Sea has scientists worried about unknown impacts caused by the toxic nature of the ultra-light, highly flammable oil.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags