Earth Hour

World Citizens Switch Off the Lights for One Hour every March




Earth Hour is calling upon us all to symbolically cast our vote for Earth by turning off our lights for one hour on a specified day in March each year. In 2009, nearly a billion world citizens voted this way in 4,000 cities in 87 countries on seven continents. The event sponsor, World Wildlife Fund (WWF), notes that iconic U.S. landmarks, too, dim their lights as part of the largest call for action on climate change in history.

American landmarks hitting the switch range from the Golden Gate Bridge and Last Vegas strip to Mount Rushmore, joined by local monuments in or near Seattle, Flagstaff, Indianapolis and Atlanta. Cities, schools, businesses and organizations in all 50 states are expected to participate.

“Climate change is impacting our water resources, energy supplies, transportation, agriculture and health, putting our livelihoods and economic future at risk in every part of the country,” explains WWF Climate Director Keya Chatterjee. “Americans will not only be sending a signal that they want solutions to the climate crisis, they’ll be helping to turn the lights out on our nation’s dangerous dependency on foreign oil and an unsustainable economic future.”


Find information on this year's event and event tools at www.MyEarthHour.org.

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