Mercury-Free Dentistry

U.S. Supports Ending Amalgam Cavity Fillings




In a watershed move toward global mercury-free dentistry, the International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology (IAOMT) recently reported that the U.S. government has announced that it supports a “phase down, with the goal of eventual phase out… of mercury amalgam.” That’s the silver-and-mercury-mixed material commonly used to fill cavities in teeth.

This represents a radical reversal of the government’s former position that, “Any change toward the use of dental amalgam is likely to result in positive public health outcomes.” The new stance will be submitted at the third round of negotiations for the world mercury treaty. The IAOMT sees this as “an extraordinary development that will change the global debate about amalgam.”

The IAOMT, a global network of 700 dental, medical and research professionals, is a longtime opponent of mercury amalgam because of possible health risks from mercury, a known toxin. It is considered especially risky for children and for pregnant women, whose fetuses can be affected. Possible side effects of the continuous release of toxic vapor from mercury fillings into the body include memory loss, tremors, personality changes and impaired immune systems.

Yet, the World Dental Federation and the American Dental Association continue to maintain that mercury amalgam fillings are safe. To date, mercury fillings have been banned in Norway and restricted in Finland, Sweden, Austria, Canada and Germany. With the U.S. government on board, says Charles G. Brown, president of the World Alliance for Mercury-Free Dentistry, “The debate has shifted from whether to end amalgam to how to end amalgam.” Mercury-free dentistry supports the use of a tooth-colored, bonded composite material, made primarily of resin.


For more information, visit iaomt.org.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Gut Bacteria Imbalance Linked to Chronic Fatigue

In a Columbia University study, people with chronic fatigue syndrome were found to have an imbalance in the levels of certain gut bacteria.

Alcohol Affects Our Heartbeat

In a study during German Oktoberfest, arrhythmia showed up in the heart rhythms of 30 percent of drinkers, compared to 4 percent of the general population.

Regular Sleep Times Promote Health

Picking a wake-up time and sticking to it is a way to train the brain to fall asleep, which boosts the sleep time helpful in appetite control.

Long-Term Cell Phone Use a Health Risk

Swedish scientists have found an increased risk of glioma, a type of brain cancer, in cell phone users, with risks rising with the years and with frequency of use.

Overtime Hours Linked to Tooth Decay

Japanese financial workers that worked more than 45 hours of overtime a month had more than twice the tooth decay as those with no overtime.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags