Iced Tea Has Issues

Raises Risk of Kidney Stones




It is peak season for iced tea, but this warm-weather favorite may not be the ideal choice to counter dehydration. Iced tea made from black tea contains high concentrations of oxalate, one of the key chemicals that lead to the formation of kidney stones, a common disorder of the urinary tract that affects about 10 percent of the U.S. population.

“For people that have a tendency to form the most common type of kidney stones, iced tea is one of the worst things to drink,” reports Dr. John Milner, an assistant professor with the Department of Urology at Loyola University Chicago’s Stritch School of Medicine. While all black tea contains oxalate, dietitians note that people tend to imbibe more of it when it’s on ice than when it’s hot.

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