Don’t Take a Seat

Ideas to Get You Moving at Work




A multi-ethnic study of 4,757 U.S. adults in a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found that those who took the most daily breaks from sitting had, on average, a smaller waist circumference, fewer blood fats and reduced markers for insulin resistance than those who took the fewest breaks. The researchers also noted increased levels of C-reactive protein in the bodies of sedentary subjects, which is linked to inflammation and many chronic diseases, even in people who regularly exercise.

To get moving: Stand up to take phone calls and during meetings; walk to visit a colleague, rather than phoning or emailing; use a bathroom on a different floor; centralize trash and recycling bins and office equipment to encourage short trips during the work day; take the stairs; and park at the far end of the lot.


Source: European Society of Cardiology

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