Becoming Human

Portents of the End of Mayan Calendar in 2012




Debate is heating up as to whether December 21, 2012, the end of the Mayan calendar, heralds a global doomsday or the dawn of a golden age in consciousness. Alberto Villoldo, Ph.D., a medical anthropologist appearing in the new documentary, 2012: Science or Superstition, who has studied the healing traditions of the Andes and the Amazon for 20 years, is in the latter camp. He points to the optimism of indigenous prophesies of the Hopi, Maya, Inca and Apache, read in the organizing matrix of the Earth.

According to the Maya, humanity is set to first appear on the planet on that auspicious December day; so at the moment, we’re still proto-humans, still half-cooked. “Today we have the possibility to break free from the nightmare of our past of violence and exploitation,” explains Villoldo. “We have the opportunity to clear the slate both individually and collectively. We can quantum leap into [being] new humans. We can fully become whole-brain creatures that utilize our entire brain and not just our stomachs and reproductive organs and mouths.” The anticipated reward is the ability to fully reside in the mystery of the human experience.

You can receive 2012: Science or Superstition plus three great short films for free when you sign up for a trial membership of Spiritual Cinema Circle (just pay a small shipping fee). Go to: JoinSCC.com. For more information about Alberto Villoldo, his books and workshops, visit www.TheFourWinds.com. Discover more at www.2012dvd.com.

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