Diabetes Newsflash

A Reason to Skip the Cup of Coffee




Taking the simple step of cutting caffeine from our diets can help control diabetes, say researchers at the Duke University Medical Center. Daily consumption of caffeine in coffee, tea, or soft drinks increases blood sugar levels for people with Type 2 diabetes, undermining individuals’ efforts to control the disease.

The researchers theorize that caffeine may interfere with the metabolic process that moves glucose from the blood into muscle and other cells, where it is used for fuel. They also think that caffeine triggers the release of adrenaline—the fight-orflight hormone—known to boost sugar levels in the bloodstream.

“Coffee is such a common drink in our society that we forget that it contains a powerful drug—caffeine,” cautions Dr. James Lane, a psychologist and lead author of the newly-released study. “Our findings suggest that one way to lower blood sugar is to simply quit drinking coffee or any other caffeinated beverages. It may not be easy but it doesn’t cost a dime and there are no adverse side effects.”

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Banning Trans Fats Lowers Heart Attacks

Heart attack hospital admissions declined in New York counties that banned trans fat food in restaurants.

The Five-Second Rule Debunked

Rutgers researchers found that food dropped on the floor for even one second can be contaminated with bacteria, and that carpet transferred fewer bacteria than tile and stainless steel.

Energy Drinks Harm the Heart

Two cans of an energy drink per day produced abnormal heart rhythms and higher blood pressure in healthy adults.

High-Fructose Sweetener Aggravates Asthma and Bronchitis

People with a history of chronic bronchitis that routinely drank five or more high-fructose corn syrup sodas a week showed an 80 percent increase in bronchitis incidents.

Scientists Urge Ban on Non-Stick Pan Coatings

Citing research links to liver, nerve and heart disorders, more than 200 scientists have called for a halt to the production of the chemicals used to coat non-stick cookware.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags