More Bok Choy, Less Ice Cream Boosts Breast Health

Cruciferous Veggies Reduces the Risk




Chowing down on cruciferous veggies reduces the risk of recurring breast cancer, say Vanderbilt University researchers, while consuming too many high-fat dairy products produces an opposite effect, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

The paper on veggies presented at the American Association for Cancer Research showed that the more cruciferous vegetables a woman ate in the first two years after her breast cancer diagnosis, the lower was her risk of the cancer returning or death from the original cancer. Eating broccoli, cauliflower, bok choy and cabbage worked to reduce the rate of recurring breast cancer by 35 percent and the risk of death in the following nine years by 62 percent.

On the other side of the coin, the NCI study showed that women treated for early stage breast cancer that regularly ate one or more servings of high-fat milk, cheese, yogurt or ice cream increased their risk of dying of breast cancer by 44 percent and of earlier death from all causes by 64 percent.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Fiber Lowers Blood Sugar

A diet high in diverse fibers lowered blood sugar levels to normal for 89 percent of diabetes patients in a Rutgers University study.

Eating Apples and Tomatoes Repairs Lungs

Fresh tomatoes and fruit, especially apples, help heal damaged lungs of ex-smokers and can slow the natural decline of lung function that typically occurs after age 30.

Gooseberries are Good for the Gut

Malaysian subjects with gastrointestinal problems had less pain, vomiting and sleep loss when receiving an ayurvedic remedy known as Indian gooseberry.

Chocolate and Olive Oil Help Heart Health

Italians eating dark chocolate combined with olive oil had lower cholesterol and blood pressure in just 28 days.

Lutein in Greens and Eggs Slows Cognitive Aging

In a University of Illinois study, adults that ate large amounts of leafy greens, avocados and eggs had levels of lutein, a brain and eye nutrient, on par with younger people.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags