Mammograms Carry Cancer Risk

Dangers of Routine Screenings




There is growing evidence that mammograms, which are the primary screening tool for breast cancer, may cause it. Scientists have long known that radiation causes cancer, and now research published in the British Journal of Radiobiology reports that the so-called “low-energy X-rays” used in mammography are four to six times more likely to cause breast cancer than conventional high-energy X-rays because the low-energy variety causes more mutational damage to cells.

Mammograms led to a 30 percent rate of over-diagnosis and overtreatment, according to a study published in the Cochrane Review. Researchers wrote in the study, “This means that for every 2,000 women invited for screening throughout 10 years, one will have her life prolonged and 10 healthy women, who would not have been diagnosed if there had not been screening, will be treated unnecessarily. Furthermore, more than 200 women will experience important psychological distress for many months because of false positive findings.”

Many women and functional medicine doctors are now choosing non-invasive and radiation-free annual thermograms as a safer alternative. Those at high risk for breast cancer may choose to do periodic MRI screenings, a recommendation supported by research at Britain’s University Hospitals Birmingham.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Gut Bacteria Imbalance Linked to Chronic Fatigue

In a Columbia University study, people with chronic fatigue syndrome were found to have an imbalance in the levels of certain gut bacteria.

Alcohol Affects Our Heartbeat

In a study during German Oktoberfest, arrhythmia showed up in the heart rhythms of 30 percent of drinkers, compared to 4 percent of the general population.

Long-Term Cell Phone Use a Health Risk

Swedish scientists have found an increased risk of glioma, a type of brain cancer, in cell phone users, with risks rising with the years and with frequency of use.

Regular Sleep Times Promote Health

Picking a wake-up time and sticking to it is a way to train the brain to fall asleep, which boosts the sleep time helpful in appetite control.

Overtime Hours Linked to Tooth Decay

Japanese financial workers that worked more than 45 hours of overtime a month had more than twice the tooth decay as those with no overtime.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags