Shell Game

Turtles Facing Extinction Get Help




The Turtle Survival Alliance Foundation (TSA) is opening a facility to house some of the world’s most endangered freshwater turtles and tortoises near Charleston, South Carolina. The 50-acre Turtle Survival Center will maintain living groups, or assurance colonies, of many species facing an uncertain future in the wild.

The center will house 20 species of freshwater turtles and tortoises ranked “critically endangered” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. Nine are also on the Turtle Conservation Coalition list of the world’s most endangered tortoises and freshwater turtles.

According to TSA President Rick Hudson, “No group of animals is under greater threat or faces a higher risk of extinction than freshwater turtles and tortoises.” The center will focus on species that have little chance of being recovered in nature because of habitat loss and intensive hunting pressures.

Some species have undergone such dramatic declines that without intervention, their extinction is imminent. It’s hoped that offspring born at the center will eventually repopulate their ancestral habitats.


Contribute to the TSA Turtle Survival Center capital campaign to help at TurtleSurvival.org.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Women Warriors

The first majority-female anti-poaching unit in South Africa is saving rhinos and with it, the moral fabric of communities.

We Need Trees

With the loss of 73.4 million acres of tree cover globally in 2016, annual tree-planting programs like Arbor Day in the U.S. and more massive tree-planting programs like those in Brazil, India and New Zealand are sorely needed.

Sway Congress

The Trump Administration’s Fiscal Year 2019 budget again calls on Congress to lift long-standing prohibitions on the destruction and slaughter of wild horses and burros.

Wildlife Wipeout

More than a million birds and bats are killed annually by wind turbines, but fatalities are cut if the turbines are located offshore and are turned off during low wind speeds.

Tea Time

Australian scientists are seeking citizens around the world to bury tea bags in wetlands to measure the rate as which the bags capture and store carbon.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags