Mailbox Makeover

Banish Unwanted Catalogs




The holidays have come and gone and a new year is here, heralded by a mailbox still engorged with resource-wasting, old and new catalog clutter. Altogether, some 20 billion catalogs are mailed annually, to the frustration of Earth-conscious shoppers. According to the nonprofit ForestEthics, the average American will spend the equivalent of eight months of their life dealing with junk mail. We all can save valuable time, conserve America’s forests, ease up on overflowing landfills, and reduce fuel and other materials wasted on unwanted catalogs by following these simple tips.

1. Ditch duplicate mailings. If you receive multiples of a catalog you like, call and ask the company to remove the extra listing.

2. Delete your address. The Direct Marketing Association (dmaChoice.org) will add your name to a “delete” list for direct marketers through its Mail Preference Service. It’s free online, or $1 by mail.

3. Sign up with a service. Options available for a modest fee include CatalogChoice.org, StopTheJunkMail.com and 41Pounds.org.

4. Switch to email. Most retailers can email promotion and sale notifications, with links to their websites and digital catalogs.

5. Recycle catalogs after browsing. If the local recycling program doesn’t accept them, search Earth911.org by Zip code to find the nearest facility that does.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Eco Sneakers

With a compostable sneaker made of cotton and corn, Reebok is moving to reduce the negative impact of shoes on the environment.

Easy Mark

European supermarkets are cutting costs and saving energy by using high-tech lasers to mark prices on avocados, sweet potatoes and coconuts, with more to come.

Autonomous Autos

Within seven years, driverless cars will be hitting the market, and studies project they will eventually slash driving-related deaths by two-thirds and lower fuel use by 20 percent.

Prohibiting Plastic

From Tasmania to San Francisco to Morocco, governments are moving against pollution and trash by banning plastic shopping bags, water bottles and even microbeads.

Cycling Chicago

With 100 miles of new bike lanes already, Chicago is now moving to build floating, solar-powered paths along the Chicago River to create an auto-free commute.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags