Keeping Our Thyroid Healthy

Key Nutrients for This Vital Gland




The thyroid, one of the most important glands, influences many body functions, including maintaining energy levels, sleep and metabolism. To function properly, it needs the right nutrients, foremost among which is iodine, a basic building block of thyroid hormones.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, iodine deficiency is on the rise in the United States, and choosing foods wisely is crucial. Sea vegetables, such as kelp, wakame and nori, the seaweed used for making sushi, are good sources of iodine and many other key minerals that support thyroid health.

Zinc, iron and copper are essential to producing thyroid hormones, and antioxidants like vitamins A, C and E are necessary for neutralizing physical oxidative stress, a condition that often occurs along with poor thyroid function. Selenium, a trace mineral needed only in tiny amounts, is readily supplied in foods like Brazil nuts, peanuts, fish, eggs, parsley, oats and mushrooms, as well as the noted sea vegetables.

Source:
Adapted from WomentoWomen.com.

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