Living Together

2014 Global Peace Index




The world has become less peaceful over the last seven years, according to the 2014 Global Peace Index. It measures peace in 162 countries according to 22 indicators that gauge both the absence and fear of violence. This is the seventh year the index has been produced.

Results from the 2014 Global Peace Index show that since 2008, 111 countries have deteriorated in levels of peace, while 51 increased. Europe retains its position as the most peaceful region, with 14 of the top 20 most peaceful countries. The world has become significantly less peaceful over the last year, mainly due to a rise in terrorist activity, conflicts being fought, and refugees and other displaced people.

As for the human toll, 500 million people live in countries at risk of instability and conflict, 200 million of whom live below the poverty line. The global economic impact of violence reached $9.8 trillion last year, equal to twice the total gross domestic product of Africa.


Visit VisionOfHumanity.org to explore the interactive peace map and download the report. Watch a video at Tinyurl.com/GlobalPeaceVideo.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Lower Overhead

Cincinnati has purchased 100 percent renewable energy to operate most of its municipal buildings through at least 2021, cutting its utility rates by more than $100,000 annually.

Independent Action

More than 50 mayors from around the globe have signed the Chicago Climate Charter, intended to guide cities toward reaching greenhouse gas emissions reductions similar to those targeted in the Paris climate accord.

Deadly Cargo

The Iranian tanker Sanchi oil spill in the East China Sea has scientists worried about unknown impacts caused by the toxic nature of the ultra-light, highly flammable oil.

Eco-Villains

A beach cleanup in the Philippines resulted in the finding that Nestlé, Unilever and the Indonesian company PT Torabika Mayora were the top sources of plastic waste there.

Green Team

The Seattle Mariners’ Safeco Field recycles 96 percent of all waste, garnering the team Major League Baseball’s Green Glove Award for 2017.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags