Red, White and True

Look for the American Heart Associate Heart-Check Mark




Bag the guesswork of grocery shopping and let the American Heart Association (AHA) Heart-Check mark help identify healthy foods. The red-and-white icon, created in 1995 and now found on product packaging, is a solid first step in building a heart-friendly diet.

The AHA is now beginning to include foods with high levels of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats—the “good” fats—in the Heart-Check program. Updated requirements also covering sodium, sugar and fiber will take effect in 2014 to allow food manufacturers time to reformulate their products.

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