Low Tech

Silicon Valley School Eschews Computers




The Waldorf School of the Peninsula, in Los Altos, California, is one of 160 Waldorf schools in the country that subscribe to a teaching philosophy focused on physical activity and learning through creative, hands-on tasks. The New York Times reports that the chief technology officer of eBay sends his children to this nineclassroom institution, as do employees of Silicon Valley giants like Google, Apple, Yahoo and Hewlett-Packard.

Yet, the school’s main teaching tools are anything but high-tech, comprising pen and paper, knitting needles and occasionally, mud. No computers or screens of any kind are allowed in the classroom, and the school frowns on their use at home.

Educators that endorse this approach say computers inhibit creative thinking, movement, human interaction and attention spans. Alan Eagle, a communications executive at Google, whose daughter attends the school, says, “The idea that an app on an iPad can better teach my kids to read or do arithmetic, that’s ridiculous.”


Source: The New York Times

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