Blogging News

Teens See More Kindness than Cruelty Online




As American teens navigate the new world of digital citizenship, a new study has found that 69 percent say their peers are mostly being kind to one another on social networking sites. Still, 12 percent say they witness meanness frequently, 29 percent sometimes and 47 percent only once in a while; 15 percent report that they have personally been the targets of mean or cruel behavior online.

The findings are based on focus groups and a national survey of youths ages 12 to 17 and their parents, conducted by the Pew Research Center Inter- net & American Life Project.


Find the full report at Tinyurl.com/7kl3cuj.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Dirt Houses Cancer-Protective Microbe

Soil contains bacteria that kills melanoma cancer cells, say Oregon State University researchers.

Doctors Underestimate Opioid Prescriptions

A survey of 109 emergency room doctors found they frequently underestimated how often they prescribed opioids and that they prescribed fewer when alerted to the situation.

Asthma Less Likely to Afflict Breastfed Kids

Dutch children that had been breastfed had a 45 percent lower incidence of asthma later in childhood.

Spanking Linked to Mental Health Problems

Adults that were spanked as children turned out to have a higher risk of depression, suicide attempts, drinking and drug use, according to University of Michigan researchers.

Wild Berries Prove Anti-Cancer Prowess

A naturally occurring compound found abundantly in wild berries increases the cancer-fighting ability of sirtuin 6 enzymes.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags